Research Outputs


Publication: Open PHACTS computational protocols for in silico target validation of cellular phenotypic screens: knowing the knowns

Phenotypic screening is in a renaissance phase and is expected by many academic and industry leaders to accelerate the discovery of new drugs for new biology. Given that phenotypic screening is per definition target agnostic, the emphasis of in silico and in vitro follow-up work is on the exploration of possible molecular mechanisms and efficacy targets underlying the biological processes interrogated by the phenotypic screening experiments. Herein, we present six exemplar computational protocols for the interpretation of cellular phenotypic screens based on the integration of compound, target, pathway, and disease data established by the IMI Open PHACTS project. The protocols annotate phenotypic hit lists and allow follow-up experiments and mechanistic conclusions. The annotations included are from ChEMBL, ChEBI, GO, WikiPathways and DisGeNET. Also provided are protocols which select from the IUPHAR/BPS Guide to PHARMACOLOGY interaction file selective compounds to probe potential targets and a correlation robot which systematically aims to identify an overlap of active compounds in both the phenotypic as well as any kinase assay. The protocols are applied to a phenotypic pre-lamin A/C splicing assay selected from the ChEMBL database to illustrate the process. The computational protocols make use of the Open PHACTS API and data and are built within the Pipeline Pilot and KNIME workflow tools.

D. Digles,   B. Zdrazil,   J.-M. Neefs,   H. Van Vlijmen,  C. Herhaus,   A. Caracoti,   J. Brea,   B. Roibás,  M. I. Loza,   N. Queralt-Rosinach,   L. I. Furlong,  A. Gaulton,   L. Bartek,   S. Senger,   C. Chichester,  O. Engkvist,   C. T. Evelo,   N. I. Franklin,   D. Marren,  G. F. Ecker and   E. Jacoby  

Full publication: Med. Chem. Commun., 2016, 7, 1237-1244


Publication: Using the Semantic Web for Rapid Integration of WikiPathways with Other Biological Online Data Resources

The diversity of online resources storing biological data in different formats provides a challenge for bioinformaticians to integrate and analyse their biological data. The semantic web provides a standard to facilitate knowledge integration using statements built as triples describing a relation between two objects. WikiPathways, an online collaborative pathway resource, is now available in the semantic web through a SPARQL endpoint at http://sparql.wikipathways.org. Having biological pathways in the semantic web allows rapid integration with data from other resources that contain information about elements present in pathways using SPARQL queries. In order to convert WikiPathways content into meaningful triples we developed two new vocabularies that capture the graphical representation and the pathway logic, respectively. Each gene, protein, and metabolite in a given pathway is defined with a standard set of identifiers to support linking to several other biological resources in the semantic web. WikiPathways triples were loaded into the Open PHACTS discovery platform and are available through its Web API (https://dev.openphacts.org/docs) to be used in various tools for drug development. We combined various semantic web resources with the newly converted WikiPathways content using a variety of SPARQL query types and third-party resources, such as the Open PHACTS API. The ability to use pathway information to form new links across diverse biological data highlights the utility of integrating WikiPathways in the semantic web.

Andra Waagmeester, Martina Kutmon, Anders Riutta, Ryan Miller, Egon L. Willighagen, Chris T. Evelo , Alexander R. Pico

Full publication: PLOS Computational Biology, June 2016


Publication: The FAIR Guiding Principles for scientific data management and stewardship

There is an urgent need to improve the infrastructure supporting the reuse of scholarly data. A diverse set of stakeholders—representing academia, industry, funding agencies, and scholarly publishers—have come together to design and jointly endorse a concise and measureable set of principles that we refer to as the FAIR Data Principles. The intent is that these may act as a guideline for those wishing to enhance the reusability of their data holdings. Distinct from peer initiatives that focus on the human scholar, the FAIR Principles put specific emphasis on enhancing the ability of machines to automatically find and use the data, in addition to supporting its reuse by individuals. This Comment is the first formal publication of the FAIR Principles, and includes the rationale behind them, and some exemplar implementations in the community.

Mark D. Wilkinson, Michel Dumontier, IJsbrand Jan Aalbersberg, Gabrielle Appleton, Myles Axton, Arie Baak, Niklas Blomberg, Jan-Willem Boiten, Luiz Bonino da Silva Santos, Philip E. Bourne, Jildau Bouwman, Anthony J. Brookes, Tim Clark, Mercè Crosas, Ingrid Dillo, Olivier Dumon, Scott Edmunds, Chris T. Evelo, Richard Finkers, Alejandra Gonzalez-Beltran, Alasdair J.G. Gray, Paul Groth, Carole Goble, Jeffrey S. Grethe, Jaap Heringa, Peter A.C ’t Hoen, Rob Hooft, Tobias Kuhn, Ruben Kok, Joost Kok, Scott J. Lusher, Maryann E. Martone, Albert Mons, Abel L. Packer, Bengt Persson, Philippe Rocca-Serra, Marco Roos, Rene van Schaik, Susanna-Assunta Sansone, Erik Schultes, Thierry Sengstag, Ted Slater, George Strawn, Morris A. Swertz, Mark Thompson, Johan van der Lei, Erik van Mulligen, Jan Velterop, Andra Waagmeester, Peter Wittenburg, Katherine Wolstencroft, Jun Zhao, Barend Mons

Full publication: Scientific Data, Volume 3, Article 160018, March 2016


Publication: Selectivity profiling of BCRP versus P-gp inhibition: from automated collection of polypharmacology data to multi-label learning

The human ATP binding cassette transporters Breast Cancer Resistance Protein (BCRP) and Multidrug Resistance Protein 1 (P-gp) are co-expressed in many tissues and barriers, especially at the blood–brain barrier and at the hepatocyte canalicular membrane. Understanding their interplay in affecting the pharmacokinetics of drugs is of prime interest. In silico tools to predict inhibition and substrate profiles towards BCRP and P-gp might serve as early filters in the drug discovery and development process. However, to build such models, pharmacological data must be collected for both targets, which is a tedious task, often involving manual and poorly reproducible steps.

Floriane Montanari, Barbara Zdrazil, Daniela Digles, Gerhard F. Ecker

Full publication: Journal of Cheminformatics, Volume 8:7, February 2016


Publication: WikiPathways: capturing the full diversity of pathway knowledge

WikiPathways (http://www.wikipathways.org) is an open, collaborative platform for capturing and disseminating models of biological pathways for data visualization and analysis. Since our last NAR update, 4 years ago, WikiPathways has experienced massive growth in content, which continues to be contributed by hundreds of individuals each year. New aspects of the diversity and depth of the collected pathways are described from the perspective of researchers interested in using pathway information in their studies. We introduce the Quick Edit feature for pathway authors and curators, in addition to new means of publishing pathways and maintaining custom pathway collections to serve specific research topics and communities. In addition to the latest milestones in our pathway collection and curation effort, we also highlight the latest means to access the content as publishable figures, as standard data files, and as linked data, including bulk and programmatic access.

Martina Kutmon, Anders Riutta, Nuno Nunes, Kristina Hanspers, Egon L. Willighagen, Anwesha Bohler, Jonathan Mélius, Andra Waagmeester, Sravanthi R. Sinha, Ryan Miller, Susan L. Coort, Elisa Cirillo, Bart Smeets, Chris T. Evelo, Alexander R. Pico

Full publication: Nucleic Acids Research, 2015


Publication: Managing expectations: assessment of chemistry databases generated by automated extraction of chemical structures from patents

First public disclosure of new chemical entities often takes place in patents, which makes them an important source of information. However, with an ever increasing number of patent applications, manual processing and curation on such a large scale becomes even more challenging. An alternative approach better suited for this large corpus of documents is the automated extraction of chemical structures. A number of patent chemistry databases generated by using the latter approach are now available but little is known that can help to manage expectations when using them. This study aims to address this by comparing two such freely available sources, SureChEMBL and IBM SIIP (IBM Strategic Intellectual Property Insight Platform), with manually curated commercial databases.

Stefan Senger, Luca Bartek, George Papadatos, Anna Gaulton

Full publication: Journal of Cheminformatics, Volume 7:49, October 2015